pembrokeshire

2 chapels, 2 gigs. St Davids Tabernacle and StudiOwz

The latest venue for Boia Gigs was the crypt of the Tabernacle chapel in St Davids. A gothic design built in 1877, the chapel is an imposing building but unless you are a member of the tiny congregation, you’d be forgiven for not noticing it on your way through St Davids. Downstairs is usually used for Sunday School but last week opened its doors to host Dan Bettridge (Ogmore, Wales) and The Brother Brothers (Brooklyn, NY). One of the attractions of live music is hearing a little background about the songs and the ideas behind the lyrics. The Brother Brothers were brilliant at filling in the history that inspired their writing and some of the covers they performed, but were also funny and engaging which made for a great show. As identical twins they referenced other familial duos from down the ages and are adeptly carrying on the tradition. Go see them if you get the chance. They were supported by Dan Bettridge who showcased his great guitar sound and songwriting.

John Blek returned from County Cork to Pembrokeshire last night to play at StudiOwz before he takes to the stage at the Tabernacle Chapel in St Davids tonight. When I heard he was playing at the studio I knew that John’s songs were perfectly suited to it and it was a treat to hear his music there. Plucking out his melodies and delivering his soul rending lyrics in such a venue was spellbinding. In the crowded world of male singer songwriters, John Blek stands out as a true talent with plenty of outstanding songs that should be getting more radio play over here. Look out for chances to see him live and buy his records.

Winter at West Dale Bay

West Dale Bay. Not a beach I visit too often but I decided to head down here today; a cloudy and blowy December afternoon. I’ve upgraded my kit recently which makes it easier to make panoramic or ‘stitched’ images because my computer no longer scratches its head and freezes when I ask it nicely to help me create one. In the distance is Skokholm island; a bird reserve inhabited mainly by manx shearwaters, puffins, the usual auks, like razorbill and guillemot, and also storm petrels.

I think this one would look great as a big canvas print. Get in touch if you agree and have a wall it would suit!

Trinant. A Pembrokeshire farm

I went to the Preseli Hills the other day to go and have a look at Trinant farm. Long abandoned; it was once a sheep farm where the owners would have lived and worked. There are a number of these abandoned farms in Pembrokeshire. Presumably the farm became unprofitable and the house, in its awkward location on the Southern flank of the hills, wasn’t a property that anyone wanted to take on. The house is slowly decaying where it stands but inside you can still see the fireplace and other features that hint towards the past and the lives lived within the walls. There are no cables visible so winters must have been cold and dark. Records show that children were born in this house and I wonder if their descendants have ever stopped by to see how their ancestors lived not so many generations ago.

Porthselau Beach

Porthselau beach is a small bay not far around the coast from the popular Whitesands Bay but being a little harder to access, it’s far less busy. On this particular day, I was alone on the beach as the beginnings of a big swell sent waves rushing into the bay and up the sand (chalk it up as another wet sock day). The following days, storm Callum arrived and caused a fair amount of flooding and damage.

The last of the days light managed to peep through gaps in the clouds to add a barely perceptible warmth to the rocks and add a bit of illumination to the green of the cliff face. Autumn was making it’s presence felt and giving a taste of the Winter to come as heavy clouds scudded across the sky and the wind had a bite we haven’t felt for a while.

Apparently, Porthselau has an interesting history. The beach is said to have a tunnel that connects to a nearby farmhouse and allowed smugglers to safely get illicit alcohol ashore. Also from this beach, whilst out walking one morning, a former high sheriff and magistrate named Thomas Williams spotted the ships that formed the French invasion of 1797. He was wary of the boats and through his telescope realised that upon the deck stood a crowd of troops and despite flying British colours, he didn’t fall for the trick and sent a messenger to St Davids to raise the alarm.

Live Music: Joey Landreth, John Blek, Nathan Bell and Rosey Cale

More visitors from over the water came to St Davids to play Boia Gigs events. Joey Landreth came over from Canada and a little closer, from Cork, Ireland, John Blek included St Davids in a mini tour of the UK. Another fantastic couple of evenings showcasing some brilliant songwriting and sublime playing. The pick of the tunes for me was this one from John Blek…

In October, Nathan Bell came from Tennessee to play us some captivating Americana folk songs coupled with evocative story telling. Drawing on the experiences of a life as a working man in the USA, Nathan intertwines his songs with reflections on life, love and modern America. Support came from the talented local singer songwriter, Rosey Cale showcasing her self penned works and exceptional voice.

Live Music: Twin Bandit and Sky Barkers

On Thursday at The Meadow in St Davids, I went along to take some pictures of Twin Bandit (a folk duo/band from Vancouver, Canada) and local duo Sky Barkers playing some beautiful tunes. We don't often get live acts making the effort to journey all the way to play for us in Pembrokeshire so it's been lovely to have Boia Gigs attract some quality acts to St Davids.

Twin Bandit are on a European tour and had been in London the previous evening before flying to Amsterdam the following day; from Britain's largest city to it's smallest before hitting mainland Europe, we appreciated the effort! Be sure to check them out if they are in your neighbourhood.

The Meadow is also recommended as a great place to get fed and watered if you're in St Davids.

You have a talent for capturing expression and the feeling of that show. We are so grateful, it was a beautiful night and it’s such a joy to remember it by these pictures!
— Twin Bandit

Panning for gold

Soundtrack: Kurt Vile - Goldtone

Sometimes (often) I get a bit lost for inspiration; I stand in the kitchen and munch on cashews or glug a cup of tea mulling over where to go and no place appeals. I slowly get my stuff together and sit in the car growing frustrated at my indecision, feeling like I've exhausted all local options, feeling like I can't face the process of finding a spot and creating an image. The light will be bad, the wind will be too fierce, the tide will be wrong.

The light is threatening to disappear.

When the situation starts to become ridiculous I start the car and drive. Left or right is the first decision and the next junction comes before I've reached a conclusion. I start to get a little despairing and often it turns out to be the best recipe for a decent shot. A 'f*ck it' attitude is often useful creatively. Head to the coast, park the car, grab the camera, leave the tripod in the car, watch the sun go and the last light turn to a thin band on the horizon. Golden Hour turns to Blue Hour; waves race out of the gloom. Start shooting.

Panning the camera from one side to the other gives this effect. Waves, clouds and horizon are rendered in silken tones and a sense of the atmosphere of standing beside the water in the gathering gloom is conveyed. Don't you think?

I often listen to music to help find inspiration. The above tune seemed to go well. Thanks to Kurt Vile.

Take a View Landscape Photographer of the Year 2017 - Commended Image

You might have seen my earlier post saying I had been shortlisted in the Take a View Landscape Photographer of the Year. Well I'm pleased to say my image was Commended and I have been included in this years book which is out today. All the images from this year will be on display in London's Waterloo station from the 20th November until February 4th.

It's a picture that took a while to get. Most of my shots require a number of visits to a place to get the image I am looking for. This one is no exception; I took shots through Winter when the barley was just sprouting all the way through to Autumn when it had been harvested and the field was just stubble. In each one the light was different. I knew at the time I took it that it was a good one but I'm really pleased that the judges liked it too and that it's made it into this years collection.

If you'd like a print they will soon be available via my shop page (when I've built it!)

TakeAView.jpg

Long exposures and wet feet

We've been very lucky this Spring. At the moment I'm writing whilst rain falls outside but we've had some beautiful days recently. I've taken the opportunity when possible to get down to the sea and enjoy the sun and the water.

Sometimes it's nice just to go out, stand around in ankle deep water and take some really simple shots of the water doing it's thing. I've enjoyed a few hours spent this way in the last few weeks. To get this smooth effect with the water requires a bit of technique. Some of these were taken in bright sunshine where usually the shutter speed would be very fast. A neutral density filter helps cut the amount of light getting into the camera allowing longer shutter speeds without overexposing the shot. Slowing down the shutter speed smooths out the textures as the water washes in and out but leaves patterns behind. Each exposure is about 6 seconds long (longer on some of the shots taken later in the day) and each exposure can create it's own interesting effect. When I go out to take this type of shot, I often spend many minutes taking essentially the same shot but enjoying all the different effects each new wave can bring. As usual, I come back with a whole load of shots from this type of day so this little selection are the best from maybe 50 shots.

The first shot is taken from the beach at Newgale. If you look closely you can see a tanker on the horizon. St Brides Bay often becomes home to a few ships moored up waiting for their slot in the harbour at Milford Haven and they can be there for a few days or sometimes much more. I'm more of a landlubber myself so find it strange the life of the folk on those big boats. I find it odd to think of being out in all that space surrounded by water for weeks at a time but the captain of a tall ship once told me that was the appeal for him. I guess we all go and find that space somewhere although I suppose the motivation is more monetary for the folk aboard that tanker.

These were taken at Newgale, Marloes and Penycwm.

Changing light at Druidston Bay

These are pretty much the same shot down at Druidston Bay the other night but I thought it was interesting to show how the light changed over the course of 20 minutes between the first and last shot here. With the sun still above the horizon, shades of gold light up the clouds and give the wet sand a metallic sheen. As the sun dropped below the horizon then the gold is replaced by softer shades of pink and blue before twilight means blue takes over completely. It's then a walk back up to the car as dusk precedes night.

It's always worth hanging around after the sun has left the sky. Quite often a skyscape is made up of different types of cloud that hang out at varying altitudes. As the light changes angles, the dropping sun can still illuminate the underside of the highest clouds even when it has dipped below the horizon. On the best days it can be kaleidoscopic as different layers are revealed and new parts of the clouds are illuminated as they scud and fragment across the sky.

Which one is your favourite? I like the pastel tones that remain after the sun has gone.

Anatomy of a photo - Night time at the coast

Pembrokeshire is a great place for night and astro photography because of the relatively low levels of light pollution. A number of sights have been designated as Dark Sky Discovery Sites but many other places are dark enough for good photos too. People sometimes ask how I go about creating images at night assuming that some kind of specialist equipment is required. Although I don't consider myself an expert and make plenty of mistakes myself, here are some notes on producing the image below including equipment choices as well as logistical challenges.

This picture was taken in March last year. I noticed that it was a clear night but checked the infrared satellite imagery online to make sure it would stay clear. I also checked where the moon would be on the Lunafaqt phone app. It looked good and I saw it was pretty much a half moon which would be high enough in the sky to shine light down on the scene avoiding any shadows from the cliffs. The half moon meant that there would be plenty of light but not so much that the stars would be invisible. In full moon light you aren't able to see many stars and the scene can look like slightly weird daylight.

For long exposure (slow shutter speed) shots you need the wind to be fairly light. This night was roughly 10mph ENE wind and cold at around 4 degrees C. As anyone in Pembrokeshire knows... the wind is rarely light so I was in luck. For night photos of the sea you want some swell so you get all those nice white bits around the rocks and the state of tide will also have a bearing on how much rock is exposed to the waves. Occasionally it's possible to see the Northern Lights in Pembrokeshire. Due to our dark skies we have a good chance of seeing something if it is there so it's always a good idea to check the Aurora forecast. If there's a chance then you definitely want to be looking at a composition that faces North. So there's quite a few elements you need to align before you bother making the trip out. No cloud, light wind, right moon phase, some swell. So the usual requirement to be in the right place at the right time is true but design and some good fortune are needed to make sure you're in the position to succeed. Often you'll get to a spot and realise it isn't going to work for one reason or another, or you might shoot for a couple of hours and get home to find you haven't got a decent shot; but as with a lot of photography, by learning to to visualise what you want before you go blindly into the night and getting familiar with the technical challenges, you can improve your chances.

For decent night photos you need a good DSLR that won't produce too much 'noise' (grain) at high ISO levels when taking long exposure shots. You also need a lens that allows as much light in as possible because it's dark! F2.8 or faster is good. I shot this on my Canon 5Dii with a Tamron 24-70 2.8 lens. You also need a decent tripod because the shutter is going to be open for at least 20 seconds and you don't want any movement whilst the shutter is open. Hanging your rucksack off the tripod is a good way to stabilise it. You may also want a shutter release cable so that touching the camera doesn't cause any camera shake. You're also going to be standing around in the cold for at least an hour so best wrap up warm and maybe consider a flask of tea or port!

First off I drove 4 miles before I realised I had brought the wrong lens (a lesson learnt), so I went home, got the right lens and drove the 6 miles to Abercastle.  To get into position is roughly a 20 minute walk along the coast path to the spot I had considered in the daylight a few days before. Being careful not to fall off the cliff in the dark I set about taking a picture. The first problem is trying to focus a camera in the dark. In this instance the best way was to do it manually using Live View and the moonlight to get as close to sharp as possible. Other techniques can work well such as placing a torch in the scene where you wish to focus as it gives you a bright spot to focus on. You can also focus on the moon or stars depending on what you need to be in focus. 

To get a decent exposure you need to keep the shutter open for around 20-30 seconds. If you leave the shutter open too long you risk picking up the movement of the stars so instead of points of lights you get streaks of light (an effect you sometimes want to exploit for 'star trail' pictures). So you take a few pictures until you get the focus dead on which means standing around for 20 seconds, checking the picture, making any adjustments and repeating until you get it sharp. A bit of trial and error is needed.

As each exposure takes a good amount of time to create, it's important to make sure the composition is as you want. When you're happy you can start watching out for elements that might make a better image. For this one I waited until a big set of waves came into the bay. The whitewater produces nice borders around the rocks so it's worth trying to time it right but often you can just stand around pressing the button every 20 seconds and watching the nocturnal world go by. Keep an eye out for shooting stars, the ISS or UFO's to make the picture a bit more exciting. On the coast in North Pembrokeshire you can enjoy the rhythmic sweep of the Strumble Head lighthouse (visible on the left of the picture), consider the tankers in the bay, listen to the gulls and other sounds of the night or listen to some Leonard Cohen on your ipod whilst jumping around to keep warm.

So on to the results... On this night I took my first picture at 21:14 and took my last shot at 22:55. An hour and 40 minutes from first to last shot. I walked back to the car, got home, downloaded the pictures and had a look through what I'd got. I'd taken 57 pictures in total and realised that on this occasion I'd been ever so slightly out of focus on many of the shots, I singled out several that were A: In focus B: Nice. I then spent about half an hour processing the image using photoshop. First, eliminating some dust spots on the lens. Second, the colour balance. Moonlight has a colour temperature of around 4000k. Sunlight is around 5800k and colours will appear differently depending on your settings but you can experiment to get the best level in post processing. Needless to say I am shooting in RAW to allow these changes to be made. On Photoshop I generally use curves to add contrast and depending on the image I'll use several layers and masks to make changes to particular areas. For example, the whitewater around the rocks will require different processing than the sky or the cliffs.

And so, after leaving the house at 20:05, I returned at around 23:00. After processing I had one image I was happy with! One image in 4.5 hours! So here it is... I hope you think it was worth it.

Making the best of it at Nolton Haven

A brief trip out to Nolton Haven yesterday evening to catch the last rays of sun. Nolton is usually a little bay I only drive or cycle past on my way along that section of coast that has the more appealing stops of Druidston or Newgale to visit. As the tide was too high to fully enjoy either of those bigger beaches I decided to pull in at Nolton. Unlike those big bays, the headlands at Nolton form a tight gateway to St Brides Bay that gives it a more enclosed feel.

This shot required a little improvisation. Standing on the beach fishing my camera out of its bag I immediately realised that the the little plate that attaches camera to tripod was sitting warm and happy on my kitchen table where I'd left it. Not wanting to give up on the shot I had in mind, I placed the camera on top of the tripod anyway, took a deep breath and held it in place as best I could for the 6 seconds it took to make the picture. After a few attempts I managed to keep it still enough despite the waves sloshing around the tripod legs and climbing my wellies.

Christmas in Pembrokeshire

Being from Wiltshire orginally, I usually spend Christmas with family there but circumstances never remain the same and so this year I spent it in Pembrokeshire. Boxing day was a beautiful day so a walk on the beach with family made a lovely change from the norm. This is Newgale and a familiar picture to anyone who has seen my front cover of the OS North Pembrokeshire 1:25k map which I took in similar conditions. Sunshine and low tide will always give you a chance for some silhouettes and there were plenty of opportunities as there were scores of people burning off mince pies.  

Whitesands Bay under the Milky Way

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I always enjoy heading outside at night when the skies are clear. In Pembrokeshire we are lucky to have plenty of places where there is little in the way of light pollution and in fact, there are several areas that are designated Dark Sky Discovery Sites http://www.visitpembrokeshire.com/explore-pembrokeshire/gazing-at-the-stars/ Whitesands Bay is not on the list but is still a great place to see the stars when there's a gap in the clouds. 

I often only decide to head out when I happen to look out of the window and notice the stars are out, or when putting the bins out. Bin bag in hand, I look upwards and realise I need to get my camera out and wrap up warm for a couple of hours stood in the dark gazing upwards and attending to the technical challenges of photography in the dark. Sometimes I curse the lack of clouds if it's late and I'm ready for bed but I rarely regret making the effort to get out there.

I heard this Kafka story read on the radio recently and although I rarely slam doors or speak curtly on my departure, the story struck a chord somehow! I rarely stop by to see any friends either, it's usually a solitary practice unless I bump into the odd nocturnal animal; A fox spent a good deal of time barking at me in a cemetery once. 

If you enjoy my night photography there are some more images on my Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ThomasBownPhotography/

The Sudden Walk

by Franz Kafka

Translated by Willa and Edwin Muir

When it looks as if you had made up your mind finally to stay at home for the evening, when you have put on your house jacket and sat down after supper with a light on the table to the piece of work or the game that usually precedes your going to bed, when the weather outside is unpleasant so that staying indoors seems natural, and when you have already been sitting quietly at the table for so long that your departure must occasion surprise to everyone, when, besides, the stairs are in darkness and the front door locked, and in spite of all that you have started up in a sudden fit of restlessness, changed your jacket, abruptly dressed yourself for the street, explained that you must go out and with a few curt words of leave-taking actually gone out, banging the flat door more or less hastily according to the degree of displeasure you think you have left behind you, and when you find yourself once more in the street with limbs swinging extra freely in answer to the unexpected liberty you have procured for them, when as a result of this decisive action you feel concentrated within yourself all the potentialities of decisive action, when you recognize with more than usual significance that your strength is greater than your need to accomplish effortlessly the swiftest of changes and to cope with it, when in this frame of mind you go striding down the long streets - then for that evening you have completely got away from your family, which fades into insubstantiality, while you yourself, a firm, boldly drawn black figure, slapping yourself on the thigh, grow to your true stature.

All this is still heightened if at such a late hour in the evening you look up a friend to see how he is getting on.

From... http://www.franzkafkastories.com/index.php

And so to the picture...

Winter Wanders

This fine winter weather has got to end sometime but in the meantime it's been perfect for exploring new places with the sun low in the sky and crisp cold air.

A few weeks ago, when out at the end of the headland you can see in the waterfall pictures, I spotted a lone dog walker on the beach at Pwllcrochan which I hadn't realised was a beach you could get down to.

I walked around to it from Abermawr the other day, via the beach at Aberbach and along a beautiful section of the coast. On my first trip the tide was high so I came back the following day to have a look when the tide was low enough to have a walk on the deserted beach. It's a bit of a scramble to get down onto the beach but it's a special place for sure.

Pwllcrochan translates to Cauldron Pool which I think is a nice dramatic name for a somewhat hidden away and atmospheric place.

Autumn in Pembrokeshire

It's been a beautiful Autumn here in Pembrokeshire. With the sun low in the sky and more dramatic weather patterns starting to bear down on us, we are often treated to interesting skies and beautiful light.

Druidston Bay is a great spot to head to in autumn and when the beach is deserted due to the threat of incoming rain clouds it's the perfect place to go and enjoy having all that sand, sea and sky to yourself. Always good to head up the cliffs to the Druidstone Hotel for tea and cake afterwards.

Pembrokeshire doesn't have a huge amount of woodland due to our coastal location but those areas we do have are quite special. I headed to Minwear woods, not far from Haverfordwest, to see what the autumn leaves looked like and on a lovely sunny day, it was all you'd want from a walk in the woods.